Direct rendering with OpenSUSE 12.1 and official Radeon driver (fglrx)

Installation of the official ATI (fglrx) driver with 1-click install link on the openSUSE wiki, or by adding the repository also listed on the wiki, seems not to work properly, that is, direct rendering seems to stay disabled after installation. The fix is quite simple, as root, copy paste this into terminal:

cd /usr/lib64
rm /usr/lib64/libGL.so
rm /usr/lib64/libGL.so.1
rm /usr/lib64/libGL.so.1.2
ln -s /usr/X11R6/lib64/fglrx/fglrx-libGL.so.1.2 libGL.so
ln -s /usr/X11R6/lib64/fglrx/fglrx-libGL.so.1.2 libGL.so.1
ln -s /usr/X11R6/lib64/fglrx/fglrx-libGL.so.1.2 libGL.so.1.2

Optionally, backup the original libGL.so.1 and libGL.so.1.2 files in /usr/lib64. If the system is not 64bit, remove the 64 part of lib64 everywhere. That’s it. After log out – log in, direct rendering should be working. Fire up a terminal and execute glxgears. If it doesn’t complain in the terminal there is no direct rendering, everything works, like in the pic below.

How glxgears start when direct rendering works

Source

Gnome 3 and how to make open source radeon driver play quitely

Gnome 3, or Gnome Shell apparently makes the worst in proprietary ATI Radeon drivers (fglrx) come out. Just tried to use the couple together in the new openSuSe 12.1 with grave consequences. There seems to be no hope with fixing that for now.

But, there is a way to fix fan speed control with the open source driver, if it’s not working for you… The only reason why I installed fglrx was because “radeon” open source driver was making my HD 4850 noisy. As it turns out, it’s relatively easy to fix that.

As root enter: echo “auto” > /sys/class/drm/card0/device/power_profile

Add that line to execute on boot, and the problem is solved…

Source: http://www.x.org/wiki/RadeonFeature